curl command in Linux with Examples – GeeksforGeeks

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Move JSON data to a file
The Windows command prompt doesn’t support single quotes. It’s a problem because cURL statements use single quotes to specify JSON data. Example:
curl {subdomain}. ^ -d ‘{“group”: {“name”: “My Group”}}’ ^ -H “Content-Type: application/json” ^ -v -u {email_address}:{password} -X POST
The statement specifies JSON data for creating a group (the -d flag stands for data). Because the JSON is enclosed in single quotes, the statement won’t work on the command line.
To fix the problem, save the JSON in a separate file and import it into the cURL statement. To modify the example above, create a file named containing the following text:
{“group”: {“name”: “My Group”}}
Next, change the cURL statement to import the JSON data with the @filename syntax:
curl {subdomain}. ^ -d ^ -H “Content-Type: application/json” ^ -v -u {email_address}:{password} -X POST
Before running the statement, use the cd command (for change directory) to navigate to the folder that contains the file. Example:
C:\> cd json_files
Then paste the cURL statement at the command prompt:
An alternative to moving the JSON to a separate file is to use double quotes around the JSON data in the cURL statement and escape the inner ones with backslashes:
-d “{\”group\””: {\””name\””: \””My Group\””}}”” \” alt=”” title=”” />

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