Best Anonymous Proxy Extension For Chrome

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The best Chrome VPN extension in 2021 | Tom's Guide

The best Chrome VPN extension in 2021 | Tom’s Guide

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Chrome VPN extensions are offered by just about every one of the best VPN providers. They’re usually pared-down versions of the desktop app, and while they might not offer every feature, they’re a convenient way of changing your location or accessing blocked websites and streaming all are created equal, either. A dedicated Chrome VPN extension will sometimes allow you to you control the desktop app from within Chrome, which is excellent in terms of functionality and power. However, others offer totally in-browser extensions, which can be very useful if you’re on a computer that doesn’t have or allow VPN clients to be makes the best Chrome VPN? When picking your Chrome VPN, you should first consider what you need from it – do you want to stay fully anonymous and explore streaming media from around the world, or do you just want a quick and easy way to check your emails and banking in privacy? If you’re only after very basic functions, you may find a free VPN for Chrome that suits your needs, but if you’re after in-depth features or streaming support, a more premium product will be help you decide, we’ve put together this list of the five best Chrome VPNs available today. Topping the list is ExpressVPN – it’s easy to use, swift and powerful, and offers a powerful Chrome VPN extension alongside its top-rated desktop VPN client. There are other options that are worth exploring, though, so read on to find the five best VPNs for Chrome available today. 1. ExpressVPN – the most powerful Chrome VPN
ExpressVPN’s Chrome VPN extension offers total control of the desktop app in-browser, and it’s the most fully-featured option available. You can claim three free months through Tom’s Guide, and you’ll also be covered by a fantastic 30-day money-back DealSave your money by checking out the best cheap VPNIf you’re serious about streaming, you might need a Fire Stick VPNWhat about P2P? See what’s the best torrenting VPNThe best Chrome VPN extensions in 2021(Image credit: ExpressVPN)1. ExpressVPN Best all-round Chrome VPN and beyondSpecificationsDedicated chrome extension: YesChrome Web Store rating: 4. 5/5Servers/countries: 3, 000+/90+Maximum devices supported: 5Reasons to buy+Feature-rich Chrome extension+Excellent 24/7 customer support+Wide international server coverage+Reliable and fastReasons to avoid-App required for extensionExpressVPN is the most powerful VPN available, period, so it makes sense that you get an absolutely stellar Chrome VPN extension too. And yes, it’s a full extension, not just a proxy like some others ‘s you get is essentially the desktop app readily available in your browser. While that means you’ll have to have the client installed, if you do, you’ll have a lot of power at your fingertips. Unlike many Chrome VPN extensions, activating ExpressVPN in-browser will give you full protection – not just your browser traffic, but your whole device. It’s also really convenient that you don’t have to launch the desktop app to use the browser extension – it’s right there in Chrome, ready to ‘ll get WebRTC blocking, location spoofing and HTTPS Everywhere (even when the extension’s not turned on) to help keep you and your browsing private, alongside swift connection speeds, other apps for all your devices, and a cracking support system to help if anything goes wrong. Plus, the Chrome VPN blocks HTML5 geolocation from revealing your location – something the desktop app doesn’t do your way onto a streaming service site through Chrome while abroad and Express will have you covered, as it unblocks Netflix, Amazon Prime, YouTube and more – impressive when you consider these streaming services are constantly trying to actively block VPNs. If you want to give the best Chrome VPN a test run, ExpressVPN offers a 30-day money-back guarantee, but we think you’ll find it’ll meet – if not surpass – your expectations of what a browser-based VPN can three months free of the best Chrome VPN
Tom’s Guide readers signing up for 12 months of ExpressVPN will bag an excellent 49% off deal, which includes 3 months additional coverage absolutely FREE. And don’t forget, if you just want to give it a try with no obligation, there’s a 30-day money back guarantee that you can rely upon without any quibbles.
View Deal(Image credit: Future)2. Windscribe Powerful and free Chrome proxy extensionSpecificationsDedicated chrome extension: YesChrome Web Store rating: 4. 7/5Servers/countries: 400+/60Maximum devices supported: UnlimitedReasons to buy+Unlimited simultaneous connections+Free 10GB monthly option+Clear privacy policy+Works without desktop clientReasons to avoid-Slightly cramped interfaceWindscribe is a great choice if you’re looking for a no-fee VPN, but what really stands out is its excellent Chrome VPN extension. While the service is a proxy, you don’t need to install the ‘real’ VPN client on your PC to get it working – that’s really useful for work laptops and other devices you might not want or be able to install software on, and addresses one of the main issues of the ExpressVPN that, the extension offers an impressive suite of features. There are tons blocking features, covering ads, social media and other trackers, WebRTC, website notifications and malware. You’ll also get timezone and user agent spoofing, plus advanced cookie controls which can be set to delete any and all when you leave a a fully-fledged VPN, Windscribe’s extension can also virtually relocate you and get you access to geo-restricted sites, and by offering servers in 10 countries (over 60 if you decide to pay for a premium plan) you should have a decent selection to choose from, including Netflix-compatible ‘Windflix’ an absolutely free service, there are a couple of drawbacks – chiefly that 10GB data limit – but for such a well-featured extension, that’s something we can excuse. If it turns out you do need more than that, premium plans also have unlimited it can’t compete in true power to ExpressVPN’s extension that controls the desktop client, it’s an entirely different beast. This standalone Chrome VPN extension is one of the best of its kind, and for free, it’s certainly worth checking out. 3. Private Internet Access Chrome VPN with tons featuresSpecificationsDedicated chrome extension: YesChrome Web Store rating: 4/5Servers/countries: 11, 000+/74Maximum devices supported: 10Reasons to buy+Feature-rich Chrome extension+Great privacy tools+Simple to useReasons to avoid-No live chat support-Limited locationsPrivate Internet Access – or PIA – is an affordable option that offers a huge amount of features in its Chrome VPN extension for the price. It also does this while remaining very easy to use, making this an ideal option for VPN are some great security features you get with its browser VPN extension including a third-party cookies blocker, Flash blocking or disabling, WebRTC leak protection, hyperlink auditing, credit card auto-filling and more. Of course, PIA will also take care of the big stuff like blocking your location from websites as well as camera or microphone access, and download speeds remain above average with the VPN running. Also, in our testing we reported that PIA can access Netflix and Hulu – although it does struggle as an iPlayer PIA doesn’t offer the amount of server locations of ExpressVPN and support is somewhat lacking, it’s a genuinely useful Chrome VPN extension available at a great price, and it’s an option worth up now on the Private Internet Access website. 4. CyberGhost Great free Chrome VPNSpecificationsDedicated chrome extension: YesChrome Web Store rating: 4. 4/5Servers/countries: 8/4 (free), 6, 200/90 (paid)Maximum devices supported: 7Reasons to buy+Good selection of free servers+Unlimited free data +Unblocks streaming mediaReasons to avoid-No kill switch or customer supportCyberGhost is known as one of the top VPNs on the market, and another string to its bow is the free Chrome VPN extension on offer. While not as powerful as the paid VPN, the browser extension can work without installing a desktop client, meaning it’s super simple to 8 servers in 4 countries, there’s a decent selection compared to some other free services, but we were really impressed with the streaming unblocking – you’ll be able to watch US Netflix and BBC you want the full package, for a very reasonable price you can upgrade to a huge 6, 200 VPN servers in 90 countries, plus you’ll get access to CyberGhost’s excellent desktop app with its streaming and torrenting streaming system. You’ll also get a kill switch, customer support and secure Flash it’s not as great as ExpressVPN, for a free Chrome VPN CyberGhost’s offering is powerful and eminently usable. And if you upgrade, things only get up now on CyberGhost’s website 5. Hotspot Shield Incredible speeds and a decent free optionSpecificationsDedicated chrome extension: YesChrome Web Store rating: 4/5Servers/countries: 3, 200+/80+Maximum devices supported: 5Reasons to buy+Super fast connections+Free trial optionReasons to avoid-Not cheap-Configuration limitedHotspot Shield is a great Chrome VPN extension option if you want something that’s simple to use, runs fast and is free. Yup, the free version works with very few strings, although it is basic with only four location choices – plus, it’s not such a fast VPN as the premium reason Hotspot Shield is so simple is that when you fire it up with a single click, it automatically picks the fastest server based on your location – you’ll be connected security you have a 256-bit encryption looking after you across the 1, 800 servers spread over 80 countries. However, fans of true privacy will be disappointed in Hotspot’s logging policy. While the provider claims not to store anything that can identify you, details like bandwidth used and connections times you’re looking for a quick, simple Chrome VPN, though, Hotspot Shield is a good choice – and with a 45-day money-back guarantee, it’s definitely worth giving a go if you just want basic privacy when you’re out and about with your up now on the Hotspot Shield Chrome VPN FAQDoes Chrome have a VPN? While Chrome is very well-featured, it doesn’t offer a built-in VPN. However, that’s not a problem as there are a huge number of browser VPNs to pick from – not least the top five above.
Thankfully, Chrome is also the perfect environment for a browser VPN to work in – it’s stable, simple, easy to use and incredibly customisable, so there are some great Chrome VPNs that will work just as reliably as their standalone there a free Chrome VPN extension? A free Chrome extension is a tempting prospect – browsing anonymity and data security for nothing sounds great. However, in practice these free services aren’t as great as they seem.
The first thing to consider is where the free service is making its money. It’s likely that you’ll be seeing ads, or, more sinisterly, it could be skimming your data and selling it for profit. If that’s happening, you’re better off using no VPN at all.
There are some good free Chrome VPNs out there – like Windscribe at number 2 on this list – but on the whole you’ll never be able to get a truly good all-round VPN experience unless you pay.
However, that doesn’t have to break the bank. Surfshark, for example, offers a totally secure and fully-featured VPN service for less than $2. 50 a month. While its Chrome VPN isn’t powerful enough to feature on this list, it works well as a lightweight proxy extension – and at a price you’d barely notice, we think it’s worth the should the best Chrome VPN extension do? A good Chrome VPN extension is one that’s not only simple to install and use but also, ideally, offers some in-depth features too. While there are basic proxy versions which simply turn on and off within Chrome – and that’s useful – we prefer more feature-rich options.
The option to pick the location you want to connect from is a really basic but helpful feature – perfect if you’re looking to watch geo-restricted content in a tab and need a certain location selected.
Security features are also really helpful with blocking your location from websites, and blocking camera or microphone access are basic necessities. Extras we like to keep an eye out for are third-party cookie blocking, Flash blocking or disabling, WebRTC leak protection, hyperlink auditing and credit card auto-filling. Being able to use Netflix VPN unblocking is also useful.
Whichever option you go for, a VPN Chrome extension is only ever as good as the VPN behind – it so going for a fully fledged and feature-rich standalone VPN is always a good idea. Got all you need to know? Now make sure that you’re getting the very best VPN service with our expertly assembled top 10.
Mo is eCommerce Editor at Tom’s Guide. Day-to-day he oversees privacy and security content, and his product guides help his readers find the best software and products for their needs. When he’s not testing VPNs, you’ll find him working on his classic car or plugged into a guitar amp.
Browse in private - Computer - Google Chrome Help

Browse in private – Computer – Google Chrome Help

If you don’t want Google Chrome to remember your activity, you can browse the web privately in Incognito mode.
On your computer, open Chrome.
At the top right, click More New Incognito Window.
A new window appears. In the top corner, check for the Incognito icon.
You can also use a keyboard shortcut to open an Incognito window:
Windows, Linux, or Chrome OS: Press Ctrl + Shift + n.
Mac: Press ⌘ + Shift + n.
You can switch between Incognito windows and regular Chrome windows. You’ll only browse in private when you’re using an Incognito window.
You can also choose to block third-party cookies when you open a new incognito window. Learn more about cookies.
Close Incognito mode to stop private browsing
Incognito mode runs in a separate window from your normal Chrome windows.
If you have an Incognito window open and you open another one, your private browsing session will continue in the new window. To exit Incognito mode, close all Incognito windows.
If you see a number next to the Incognito icon at the top right, you have more than one Incognito window open. To close an Incognito window:
On your computer, go to your Incognito window.
Close the window:
What happens when you browse privately
Chrome won’t save your browsing history, cookies and site data, or information entered in forms.
Files you download and bookmarks you create will be kept.
Your activity isn’t hidden from websites you visit, your employer or school, or your internet service provider.
Learn more about how private browsing works.
Related articles
How private browsing works
Let others browse Chrome as a guest
Clear Chrome browsing data
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How to Change Your Location in Chrome & Firefox (spoof your ...

How to Change Your Location in Chrome & Firefox (spoof your …

When you launch Firefox or Chrome browsers, they automatically employ geolocation services that can pinpoint where you’re located. This is used for various purposes, including enabling you to use map services, tagging social media posts with your location, and serving targeted ads based on where you are at a given time. However, there are plenty of situations in which you’d prefer to hide your location and even change (spoof) it, such as when you want to access geo-restricted content or simply maintain your privacy.
Thankfully, there are various methods you can use to do this, including using a VPN, manually spoofing your location, or using a dedicated browser extension. You may need to use more than one method to bypass multiple detection methods. We’ll delve into all of these options in this post.
How Firefox and Chrome can detect your location
First, let’s take a look at how Firefox and Chrome know where you are.
One of the easiest ways for Firefox, Chrome, and any other online service to tell where you’re located is through your IP address. This is a unique set of digits (and symbols in the newer IPv6) that identifies each computer connected to the internet. Part of the IP address can be used to determine your location. As such, masking your real IP address and replacing it with another one can spoof your location, making it appear that you’re located somewhere else.
However, some browsers have other methods that can decipher where you are. For example, they can use nearby wifi networks to geolocate a device even without an IP address. Turning off wifi and Bluetooth can be one option, but the likelihood is that you’ll need one or both of these, so it’s simply not an option for most users.
Using a VPN will enable you to easily change your IP address, replacing your existing one with another from a location of your choice. However, this may not bypass other geolocation services used by the browser. To overcome this issue, you can manually change your location in your browser or use an extension such as Location Guard.
Use a VPN to change your location in Firefox or Chrome
A Virtual Private Network (VPN) works by encrypting your internet traffic and tunneling it through an intermediary server. The two major benefits of a VPN are:
Encryption: The encryption factor means your internet traffic is completely secure and no one can decipher it, even if they manage to intercept it. This applies to ISPs, government agencies, cybercriminals, and anyone else who might be snooping on your activity.
Location spoofing: Because your traffic is tunneled through an intermediary server, you will be assigned an IP address from that server. When using a VPN, you can choose the location of the server you connect to and hence select where your IP address is from.
Note: the VPN will only spoof your location in terms of your IP address. So even when you’re using a VPN, your browser might be able to detect your location. As such, you may need to still manually spoof your location within the browser or use an extension like Location Guard (more on that below).
You’ll probably notice that some VPNs come with dedicated browser extensions for Firefox, Chrome, and other browsers. These can be great for location spoofing, but note that most of these do not encrypt your internet traffic when used alone.
One extension that’s a bit different from the others is the addon provided by ExpressVPN. Its Chrome and Firefox extensions act as remote controls for the device-level VPN apps, but they also automatically adjust the browser’s geolocation services. As such, the detected location matches that of the VPN server you’re connected to. This means that you don’t need to do anything else except connect to your chosen VPN server.
How to spoof your location using a VPN
Even if you’ve never used a VPN before, setting one up is very straightforward. Here’s how to change your IP address in Firefox or Chrome with a VPN:
Choose a provider, select a subscription term, and submit your payment. (We recommend NordVPN)
Download the appropriate VPN software for your device. Most reputable VPN providers offer native apps for Windows, MacOS, iOS, and Android.
Log in using your username and password (which will be provided when you signed up).
Connect to a VPN server in the location of your choice. For example, if you want to watch US Netflix, you’d select a US server. You’ll now have a different IP address which makes it appear you’re in that location.
Bear in mind that not all VPNs can unblock geo-restricted sites. Many sites, including streaming, gaming, and gambling services, have methods to detect when you are using a proxy (VPNs are included in this). Notably, many free VPNs are unable to bypass such proxy detectors. If you’re looking to access a specific service, it’s worth checking with the VPN provider if it’s able to provide access, before signing up (you can check here for VPNs working with Neflix, Amazon Prime, BBC iPlayer and Hulu).
WANT TO TRY THE TOP VPN RISK FREE? NordVPN is offering a fully-featured risk-free 30-day trial if you sign up at this page. This lets you use a zero-logs VPN with servers in 59 countries, without restriction, for a month — more than enough time to tell if it’s a good fit or not.
There are no hidden terms—just contact support within 30 days if you decide NordVPN isn’t right for you and you’ll get a full refund. Start your NordVPN trial here.
The best VPN for changing your location in Firefox and Chrome: NordVPN
We’ve put a plethora of the top-rated VPNs through some rigorous testing, and NordVPN comes out on top each time. Indeed, this is the VPN provider we recommend for use with Firefox and Chrome. Based in Panama, NordVPN operates a network of more than 5, 000 servers spanning 59 countries.
It provides users with exceptionally fast, reliable connections that are ideal for streaming, and is capable of unlocking a ton of geo-restricted sites. You can easily stream Netflix US (and other Netflix libraries), Hulu, HBO, BBC iPlayer, Amazon Prime Video, and lots more. If you have any issues finding the right server to connect to, a 24/7 live chat customer service agent is always available to help.
Included in every NordVPN subscription are apps for Windows, MacOS, Linux, iOS, and Android. Chrome and Firefox users can download dedicated browser extensions which can be used as remote controls for the appropriate VPN app.
When you connect to a server, NordVPN’s browser extension will automatically change your Firefox or Chrome geolocation data to match the VPN location you’re connected to. This means that as long as you’re using the VPN, you never have to worry about changing any settings manually; just connect to the appropriate server and you’re good to go.
NordVPN is just as impressive when it comes to privacy and security. It uses 256-bit encryption which is considered “military-grade, ” and this comes with perfect forward secrecy. You also get the best leak protection in the industry and a built-in kill switch. This means you can rest assured your data will always remain safe inside the encrypted tunnel.
Read our full review of NordVPN.
NordVPN isn’t the only excellent provider available for use with Firefox and Chrome. Other high-quality options include ExpressVPN and Surfshark.
How to manually spoof your location
If you’re just setting up Firefox or Chrome, as part of the setup process, you’ll be asked if you want to allow location services. You can simply deny this request, and for Firefox, you can skip the first set of instructions below.
But chances are you’re doing this after initial setup. In this case, you’ll need to turn the geolocation services off manually. Plus, it doesn’t help with actually changing your location, so you’ll need to do that manually too.
Manually change your location in Firefox
Here’s how to spoof your location in Firefox:
Type about:config in your browser. A warning will pop up to tell you about the risk involved in altering the advanced settings. As long as you’re happy to go ahead, click I accept the risk!
Look for the setting geo. enabled.
The value column should read “true. ” Double click it to set it to “false. ”
Note that this will only stop Firefox tracking your location. To set a new location, you can continue with the following steps:
Still in about:config, look for the setting
Change this to the location you want to “be” in. To do this, you have to enter a specific longitude and latitude value. You can use the following line of code but replace the values: data:application/json, {“location”: {“lat”: 40. 7590, “lng”: -73. 9845}, “accuracy”: 27000. 0}
The above example from a Stack Exchange user will put you in Times Square, but you can change it to wherever you want by tweaking the latitude and longitude values. There are plenty of tools to help you find out these numbers such as GPS Coordinates and
Note that if you ever want to revert back to the default settings, you can right click anywhere on the row and select Reset.
Manually change your location in Chrome
In Chrome, you can use the following instructions to spoof your location:
In a browser window, hit Ctrl+Shift+I (for Windows) or Cmd+Option+I (for MacOS). This will open the Chrome Developer Tools window.
Hit Esc, then click the Console menu (three dots to the left of Console in the lower portion of the screen).
Select Sensors and change the Geolocation dropdown to Custom location…
Enter any latitude and longitude you want.
Alternatively, you can choose one of the preset options in the Geolocation menu, including Berlin, Mumbai, or San Francisco.
Note that for the location override to work in Chrome, you have to keep the developer tools open and stay in the same browser window. If you open a new window, it will revert back to your original location. This is different to Firefox where you can open multiple windows and still have your location spoofed.
To check if these processes have worked in either browser, you can test it using a tool such as BrowserLeaks.
In the above screenshot, you can see that we managed to spoof our location to make it appear that we were actually in Times Square.
Use the Location Guard addon
If you’re happy to let an addon do the work for you, you might want to try Location Guard. This extension has two major uses:
Lower accuracy of location detection: If you’re concerned about privacy but still want to appear that you’re in the same general location, you can use this extension to hide your exact location. This means you can still enjoy the perks of geolocation services (such as local search results), without having to let browsers and third parties know exactly where you are. You can choose the level of “noise” added depending on how much you want to mask your location.
Spoof your location: Another option is to use Location Guard’s Fixed Location feature which basically does what we did earlier: enables you to select an exact location you want to appear to be in.
To use the Fixed Location feature:
Install the Location Guard extension for Firefox or Chrome.
Go to Options and change Default Level to Use fixed location.
Go to Fixed Location and choose a location on the map. You can either find your desired location manually or enter an address in the search bar. Just make sure that you “place” the pointer in your desired location — you’ll have to actually click on the map to put it in place.
Location Guard’s setup is an arguably easier option than the manual steps we outlined earlier. Plus, the extension offers an attractive and intuitive interface. Although, there is the issue that you’re using another extension, so it might not be the most ideal option for privacy-conscious users. While it worked for us, there have been complaints from some users that it hasn’t worked consistently.
WebRTC blocking
One more factor to be concerned about is WebRTC leaks. WebRTC, or Web Real-Time Communication helps facilitate audio and video browser-to-browser communication. It is built into many browsers, including Firefox and Chrome. Even when using a VPN, WebRTC can pose a risk by potentially exposing your real IP address.
Many VPNs build WebRTC protection into their software, but this is often limited to actual VPN apps, and doesn’t typically carry over to browser extensions. Some do include WebRTC leak protection in their extensions, such as NordVPN, but if you’re going with another provider, you might need to take extra precautions.
Is it possible to disable WebRTC in your browser to avoid the issue altogether. Here’s how to disable WebRTC leaks in Firefox:
Enter about:config in your Firefox address bar.
Find erconnection. enabled.
If the Value column says “true, ” then double-click the row so that it reads “false. ”
There is no similar method to do this in Chrome. However, there are extensions available that can prevent WebRTC leaks, including WebRTC Leak Prevent.
You can check to see if these methods have worked using BrowserLeaks.
Can I use a DNS proxy instead of a VPN?
It is possible to use a DNS proxy service in place of a VPN for the IP address component of location spoofing. However, you should bear in mind two major differences between VPNs and proxy servers.
The first is that a DNS proxy will only change your location if you’re visiting a site that requires geo-unblocking. For any other site, the proxy won’t kick in, and you’ll get a direct connection to that site. This means if you want privacy, a DNS proxy won’t provide it. Plus, while a DNS proxy can technically help you unblock geo-restricted content, the reality is that many are unable to bypass some heavy proxy crackdowns such as those rolled out by Netflix and BBC iPlayer.
The second big difference is that most DNS proxy services won’t encrypt your internet traffic. This means that if it’s intercepted, anyone can decipher your information. If privacy and security are concerns, then you’re better off with a VPN.
Can I use a free VPN to change my IP address?
Free VPNs will pop up all the time in your search, but these are generally not good options. For starters, in a similar vein to DNS proxies, they are less likely to be able to bypass the geo-restriction measures taken by certain sites. So chances are you won’t be able to access your favorite shows, movies, or games. What’s’ more, servers are few and far between and tend to be overloaded. Even if you can bypass restrictions, you could end up with a slow, unreliable connection.
Additionally, free VPNs tend to have rather strict data limits. If you’re looking to effectively use a VPN service for anything more than basic web browsing, you’ll find a free VPN is extremely limited.
If you’re more concerned about privacy and security, free VPNs fall short there too. Various services have been known to track user activity, sell information to third parties, and inject ads into the sites you visit. Some fail to encrypt your data and could even carry malware. It’s definitely worth the few extra bucks for a top-rated provider.
Wrapping Up
Because browsers have multiple methods in place to detect your location, to truly spoof your location, you may need to use a couple of methods. Our recommended solution is to use a VPN and manually change your location in your browser. If you find that too cumbersome (it’s a little more difficult in Chrome), then trying the Location Guard extension alongside a VPN could be a very viable solution.

Frequently Asked Questions about best anonymous proxy extension for chrome

How do I make myself Anonymous on Google Chrome?

You can also use a keyboard shortcut to open an Incognito window:Windows, Linux, or Chrome OS: Press Ctrl + Shift + n.Mac: Press ⌘ + Shift + n.

How do I fake an IP address on Chrome?

In a browser window, hit Ctrl+Shift+I (for Windows) or Cmd+Option+I (for MacOS). This will open the Chrome Developer Tools window. Hit Esc, then click the Console menu (three dots to the left of Console in the lower portion of the screen). Select Sensors and change the Geolocation dropdown to Custom location…Apr 2, 2021

Which is the best proxy extension for Chrome?

The best Chrome VPN extensions in 2021ExpressVPN. Best all-round Chrome VPN and beyond. Specifications. … Windscribe. Powerful and free Chrome proxy extension. Specifications. … Private Internet Access. Chrome VPN with tons features. … CyberGhost. Great free Chrome VPN. … Hotspot Shield. Incredible speeds and a decent free option.Sep 15, 2021

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